City With Worst Income Inequality In Wisconsin Wisconsin

The United States has some of the highest levels of income and wealth inequality in the world. Data from the U.S. Federal Reserve shows that the richest 10% of Americans control $ 93.8 trillion, more than double the $ 40.3 trillion held by the remaining 90% of Americans.

The gap between income and wealth only seems to be widening. A January 2020 report released by the Pew Research Center found that over the past four decades, income growth for the top 5% of families in terms of income has far outpaced income growth for families in the lower strata. .

In a country as large as the United States, one can expect varying levels of income inequality, and in a few parts of the country, extreme wealth and extreme poverty coexist. In almost every state, there is at least one city where income inequality is much more pronounced than it is on the national average.

Based on the Gini coefficient, a measure of income inequality expressed on a scale of 0 to 1 where 0 represents perfect equality and 1 represents the highest level of inequality, La Crosse has the worst inequality in the world. Wisconsin.

According to the US Census Bureau, the Gini coefficient for La Crosse is 0.481, the highest of any city in Wisconsin. For context, the statewide Gini score is 0.445.

In La Crosse, the top 20% of households in income account for 51.9% of all income in the region, while the poorest 20% of households account for only 3.6% of income. Across the state, the disparity is slightly less pronounced, with the top 20% of households accounting for 48.3% of income compared to 3.8% for the poorest 20%.

All data in this article are five-year estimates from the U.S. Bureau’s 2019 American Community Survey. For comparison purposes, all places covered by the census with a population greater than 25,000 – including cities, boroughs, municipalities and unincorporated communities – were considered as cities.

City Gini score Income share of the richest 20% of households (%) Share of income earned by the poorest 20% of households (%)
Alabama: Auburn 0.553 56.1 1.0
Alaska: Anchorage 0.430 47.2 4.1
Arizona: Catalina Foothills 0.507 54.1 2.9
Arkansas: Little Rock 0.533 56.9 2.7
California: Beverly Hills 0.586 62.5 1.6
Colorado: rock 0.533 55.6 1.9
Connecticut: New Haven 0.520 54.7 2.4
Delaware: Wilmington 0.544 56.7 1.9
Florida: Miami Beach 0.606 64.4 2.0
Georgia: Atlanta 0.581 61.1 1.8
Hawaii: Honolulu 0.473 50.7 3.0
Idaho: Rexburg 0.494 52.7 3.1
Illinois: Carbondale 0.599 62.5 1.1
Indiana: West Lafayette 0.578 59.7 1.1
Iowa: city of Iowa 0.511 53.0 1.9
Kansas: Leawood 0.504 54.9 3.1
Kentucky: Richmond 0.504 53.0 2.8
Louisiana: Monroe 0.591 62.2 1.7
Maine: Bangor 0.509 54.1 2.9
Maryland: Baltimore 0.515 54.0 2.3
Massachusetts: Boston 0.539 55.6 1.7
Michigan: East Lansing 0.561 57.3 1.3
Minnesota: Edina 0.537 57.0 2.4
Mississippi: Oxford 0.554 57.7 1.5
Missouri: college town 0.578 61.2 1.8
Montana: Missoula 0.487 51.9 3.1
Nebraska: Omaha 0.472 50.8 3.3
Nevada: Winchester 0.533 56.7 2.9
New Hampshire: Concorde 0.449 48.5 3.5
New Jersey: Princeton 0.563 58.8 1.8
New Mexico: Las Cruces 0.486 51.3 2.7
New York: Ithaca 0.583 60.1 1.0
North Carolina: Chapel Hill 0.549 56.7 1.8
North Dakota: Grand Forks 0.489 51.3 2.7
Ohio: Cincinnati 0.541 56.8 2.2
Oklahoma: Stillwater 0.561 57.7 1.5
Oregon: Corvallis 0.504 52.6 2.2
Pennsylvania: State College 0.569 59.0 0.9
Rhode Island: Providence 0.541 56.5 2.2
South Carolina: Colombia 0.548 57.6 2.0
South Dakota: Rapid City 0.473 51.3 3.6
Tennessee: Johnson City 0.541 57.2 2.4
Texas: Texarkana 0.550 57.7 2.1
Utah: Salt Lake City 0.501 53.5 2.8
Vermont: Burlington 0.496 52.1 2.7
Virginia: Blacksburg 0.588 59.5 0.5
Washington: Pullman 0.555 57.8 1.5
West Virginia: Charleston 0.551 58.3 2.3
Wisconsin: La Crosse 0.481 51.9 3.6
Wyoming: Laramie 0.462 49.5 3.3


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